Hematological and Biochemical Changes Caused by Antidepressants Amitriptyline Induced Cardiac Toxicity in Male Rats

Main Article Content

Afaf El Atrash
Ehab Tousson
Amani Gad
Sahar Allam

Abstract

Objects: Amitriptyline is a widely used tricyclic antidepressant. Amitriptyline is well-known for its cardiovascular side effects and toxicity in psychiatric patients. However, the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular side effects of amitriptyline remain largely undefined.


Aims: This study aims to show the hematological and biochemical changes in Amitriptyline induced cardiac toxicity in male rats.


Methodology: A total of 20 male albino rats were randomly and equally divided into 2 groups (10 rats each). G1: control group that included animals that did not receive any treatment during the experimental period. G2: Amitriptyline (Tryptizol; El Kahira Pharm And Chem Ind Co) group in which rats were injected intraperitoneally with Amitriptyline (70 mg/kg body weight/daily) for four weeks.


Results: Our results revealed that; a significant increase in sodium ions, alkaline phosphatase, AST, lipid profiles (cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL and HDL), and cardiac enzymes (CK-Mb, CPK, LDH and myoglobin) and insignificant decrease in platelets, white, and red blood cells, potassium ions, and total proteins in treated rats with amitriptyline as compared to control.


Conclusion: Amitriptyline toxicity is life-threatening and can cause acute myocarditis in addition to the known cardiotoxic profile of tricyclic anti-depressant medications. Physicians should be aware of this rare entity as a differential diagnosis for myocarditis with an unknown etiology.

Keywords:
Amitriptyline, antidepressant, cardiac enzymes, lipid profiles, electrolytes, rats

Article Details

How to Cite
Atrash, A., Tousson, E., Gad, A., & Allam, S. (2019). Hematological and Biochemical Changes Caused by Antidepressants Amitriptyline Induced Cardiac Toxicity in Male Rats. Asian Journal of Cardiology Research, 2(1), 1-6. Retrieved from http://journalajcr.com/index.php/AJCR/article/view/30094
Section
Original Research Article